The Importance of Traffic Calming

RubberForm Speed Bump used at a checkpoint to slow incoming traffic

Installing devices that slow down motor vehicles or reduces the amount of cars traveling down a street is known as traffic calming. For many reasons, professionals, such as, transportation planners or traffic engineers, implement strategies that force safe driving. The most important motive being to decrease the number of automobile accidents, but also lessening pollution caused by cars.

If your community needs help combating the danger that speeding cars cause pedestrians and motorists, traffic calming is your answer. Our top of the line recycled rubber speed humps and tables force drivers to slow to a rate of 20-30 mph. The durability and easy installation of these products make them a cost friendly response to a life threatening problem.

An increase of safety is achieved with the installation of traffic calming equipment in residential areas. Using products like speed humps and speed tables forces motorists to slow down, and may stop some drivers from traveling down certain streets. More traffic safety, means residence may spend more of their time outside. An increase of pedestrian activity in neighborhoods, means a decline in motor vehicle use. This also results in less pollution for the community.

It may be impossible to stop all traffic accidents from occurring, but using our speed humps and tables will discourage reckless driving and help save lives. All of our products are made in the U.S.A and constructed with 100% recycled rubber and plastic. If you are interested in learning more about our products, or you would like to receive a quote, visit our contact us page.

Do You Know Where Your Tires Go?

Do You Know Where Your Scrap Tires Go?
Ariel photograph of a tire landfill

Although today’s tires endure more miles than they have in the past, the amount of cars on the road is increasing along with the average number of miles driven annually. According to the ninth report on scrap tire markets issued by the Rubber Manufacturers Association (RMA), one waste (also known as scrap) tire is discarded annually per person in the United States.

But where do all these tires go? To help us answer this question, RMA did an analysis of scrap tire management in the United States. In their report for 2007, they found that more scrap tires were consumed in end-use markets than ever before. 89.3 percent to be exact. These markets include tire-derived fuel, in which about 54% of the total scrap tires generated were burned for its use. Civil engineering, ground rubber applications, and other smaller markets are included in this.

Yet, even with all of the reuse and recycling efforts, a great amount of scrap tires still end up in landfills each year. At the end of 2007, about 594.0 thousand tons of scrap tires were land filled in the United States. This compares to the 477.2 thousand tons that were reportedly land filled in 2005. This data indicated a large increase in scrap tire land filling in just two years.

It was also reported that at the end of 2007, about 128.36 million scrap tires remained in stockpiles in the United States. Stockpiles are liabilities and are a growing issue of much concern. Aside from being unsightly, rainwater accumulates in these stockpiles. This then becomes a breeding ground for an enormous number of mosquitoes that can transmit infectious disease. The real primary concern is fires. Tire pile fires can last for months, cost millions of dollars to fight, and required the evacuation of neighborhoods. They cause significant environmental harm from toxic soot fall-out, the run-off of oil and water. When burned, tires release irritants and potentially carcinogenic compounds into the atmosphere. Some experts no longer consider the question of “if” a stockpile will catch fire but “when” it will burn.

Considering all of these statistics, we should have more of an incentive to buy U.S.A-made, recycled products. So before we purchase “recycled” products sourced and manufactured off-shore, keep in mind that we need to clean up our enormous scrap tire problem here first.

More on the latest Scrap Tire Report: ustires.org/scrap-tire-markets